Archive for: September, 2014

Synchronization

Synchronization  When two or more threads need access to .1 shored resource, they need some way to ensure that the resource will be used by only one thread at a time. The process by which this is achieved is called  As you will see, Java provides unique, language-level support for it. . Kcy to synchronization is the concept…

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Using Synchronized Methods

Using -Synchronized Methods  Synchronization is easy in Java, because all objects have their on implicit monitor associated with them. To enter an object’s monitor, just call a method that has been modified with the synchronized keyword. Whiic a thread is inside a synchronized method, all other threads that try to call it (or any other synchronized method) on…

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The synchronized Statement

The synchronized Statement  While creating synchronized methods within classes that you create is an easy and effective means of achieving synchronization, it will not work in all cases. To understand why, consider the following. Imagine that you want to synchronize access to objects of a class that was not ~signed for multithreaded access. That is, the class. does not…

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Inter thread Communication

Inter thread Communication The preceding examples unconditionally blocked other threads from asynchronous access to certain methods. This use of the implicit monitors in Java objects is powerful. but you can achieve a more subtle level of control through interprocess communication. As you will see, this is especially easy in Java. As discussed earlier, multithreading replaces event loop programming by…

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Deadlock

Deadlock A special type of error that you need to avoid that relates ‘specifically to multitasking is deadlock, which occurs when two threads have a circular dependency on a pair of synchronized objects. For example, suppose one thread enters the monitor on object X and another thread enters the monitor on object Y.lf the thread in X tries…

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Sometimes, suspending And Stop Threads

Sometimes, suspending And Stop Threads   Sometimes, suspending execution of a thread is useful. For example, a separate thread can be used to display the time of day. If the user doesn’t want a clock, then its thread can be suspended. Whatever the case, suspending a thread is a simple matter . .once suspended, restarting the…

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Suspending, Resuming, and Stopping Threads Using Java 1.1 and Earlier

Suspending, Resuming, and Stopping Threads Using Java 1.1 and Earlier Prior to Java 2, a program used suspend( ) and resume( ), which are methods defined by – Thread, to pause and restart the execution of a thread. TIlKY have the form shown below: final void suspend( ) final void resume(  ) The following program demonstrates these…

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Suspending, Resuming, and Stopping Threads Using Java 2

Suspending, Resuming, and Stopping Threads Using Java 2 While the suspend ( ), resume( ), and stop( ) methods defined by Thread seem to be a perfectly reasonable and convenient approach to managing the execution of threads, they must not be used (or new Java programs. Here’s why. ‘The suspend () method of the Thread class is deprecated…

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Using Multi threading

Using Multi threading If you are like most programmers, having multithreaded support built into the language will be new to you. The key to”utilizing this ‘support effectively is to think . concurrently rather than serially. For example; when you have two subsystems within a program that can execute concurrently, make them individual threads. With the . careful use of…

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Using the Comma

Using the Comma There will be times when you will want to include more than one statement in the initialization and iteration portions of the for loop. For example, consider the loop in the following program: As you can see, the loop is controlled by the interaction of two variables. Since the loop  is go vented…

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